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20130124
20130201
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
are facing is not simply the debt ceiling. what we are facing is the sequestration, the automatic cuts of a trillion dollars over 10 years, which many republicans are seeing a willingness, expressing willingness to let set in at the end of march, and that will mean another fight and struggle. >> all this will unfold in probably six months. i think he is in a good position to fight for the next six months. >> there was an interesting and little noticed thing this week. economic members in britain came out, where they have had a very tough austerity program. now they are possibly entering into a triple dip recession. it is an example, perhaps, of too much austerity. france may be an example of too much non-austerity. but if we go through sequester, people will see what those cuts mean. i think there would be a rebellion over it. >> you could hardly accuse the united states of indulging too much in austerity. we have added $5 trillion in debt. >> i am not saying that. i am saying that what we have at this moment is a decision of how much to cut and where. the democrats are recalcitrant ab
states which is under, and if we don't resolve some of the debt ceiling and some the spending cuts, when you get into some of the fiscal order that you're talking about, you're going to have that weight on it. and even though you have proposed a lot of folks with japan in terms of some of the political leadership, they are still at negative growth with 7%. so now you're up to 50% or so of world gdp that is a drag on the economy. how do you look at the broadest sense of contagion as it relates to emerging market growth, developing country growth, with 50% of world gdp possibly in a situation? >> i think the trade figures tell at all whether you agree with that or not. i think the trade figures show what's happening. and there's no doubt picking one of the countries you mentioned, china. i mean, china for the last 20 years has been double-digit growth. last year they had one of the worst years in recent memory, we will see the final figures coming out. it didn't get below 7% which i view as a hard landing. but when you move from double-digit down to seven something are sent back, and one o
is that business seemed to respond to all the uncertainties surrounding the debt ceiling. by cutting back on capital investment, and not firing people. there was a lot of anecdotal evidence over that, that they were waiting this out. that maybe they thought this time around it was more bluff and bluster than reality that we'd hit the debt ceiling. and that seems to have paid off. people don't -- employers don't like to fire employees. not only because of, you know, being gentle human beings but because it's costly for them to do that. they tried to hold on. what we seemed to be seeing here right now is i held my exuberance last week because i thought it was a one-off seasonal adjustment thing and you do have to be careful in the month of january, as people come off the rolls because of the seasonal hiring. and there's still some reason for skepticism. but staying down at this level for a second week, joe, we've always said 350 was the bottom of the range, and we're putting in a new bottom down there this 330 that you've got to think about. probably payrolls up near 200,000 or above and ma
right, phil, thanks so so mh anyway, appreciate the time. debt ceiling fight delayed for now, but if it goes to plan, the agreement does nothing to stop automatic across the board cuts taking effect march 1st. what do we do now? mike lee joining me from capitol hill. senator lee, thanks for coming on. you know, i think a lot of americans are surprised to hear right now that we still have sequestering in place with all the rangeling going on in the last couple days. what's the plan? >> you know, at this point, there's no plan on the table because the attention has all been focused on the debt limit issue, and two are related, of course, because, ultimately, it's not the debt limit itself the problem. it is the spending that goes on propelling us forward with having the raise the debt limit every six to 18 months because we can't get spending under control. passing this in 2011, raised the debt limit then, put in place automatic cuts to kick in if the super committee dbt have a proposal. they are about to kick in. >> what do you think is going to happen? what's the talk? >> you
's republicans a-- house republicans agreed to suspend the debt ceiling. a measure that the democratically controlled senate agreed to vote on. we went to capitol hill to meet with senator mac thornberry of texas who's the number two republican. i asked him what he thought about the guidance and whether it answered the questions that gop members have been raising. >> not really. i think a lot of us wanted dod to be serious about explaining the effects of sequestration before we ever got to this point and that would have in our judgment helped motivate people to find another way. other spending cuts to take the place of the sequestration. and i still think there are a lot of questions as the services work through there with some -- this with some accounts exempt. some not. some are going to be hit pretty hard. >> overall from a good fashion and at least trying to make clear that some of those are going to be dramatic cuts? >> it was a beginning but i still think there are lots of details to be fleshed out that most people including most members of congress don't fully appreciate. just how p
, the largest in u.s. history, or if you can use the debt ceiling, which you cannot in the end pull the trigger on, because even though you could probably go without technical default for months and months, it would be catastrophic. it would mean you'd have to cut spending by 40% overnight which you can't do. so unless you can execute the bluff, don't do it because obama will call it, as he called it on january 1 of this year, as he would with the debt ceiling. don't -- if you can't carry out the bluff. i hope you weren't plauding carrying out the bluff, in which case my entire argument is undermined and has gone nowhere. >> i think that's a small contingent against suicidal charges. >> and they are on suicide watch. i hope their shoelaces have been removed. [laughter] >> so you do what i think the house members and their retreat in williamsburg very cleverly did. you pick your fights and don't try to govern from one house to get very small advances. i thought i recommended last week that in return for a temporary debt ceiling hike of three months, they demand that the senate produce a budget.
the senate passes a budget. and we're not going to just keep raising the debt ceiling. we're going to make a down payment on debt reduction, and we're going to point the country in the right direction, we're going to cut spending. [applause] you know, there will be times p when conservatives disagree on the way forward. we've never marched in lockstep. that's not what we do. a healthy debate is a good and needed thing. we can deliberate in private without fighting in public. all we should ask of each other is that we give an honest account of our actions and their reasons for them. we should challenge the left, not each other. and if we take the prudent course, you know what? we'll be in really good company. our founders were men of prudence. take james madison. nowadays we call him the founder, the father of the constitution. but at the constitutional convention, he lost some key arguments. you know, he fought the plan to give each state the same number of seats in the senate. he thought it was deeply unjust. and at first he wants -- he wanted congress to be able to veto state laws n. bot
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)